Media Enquiry

Kier Humphreys
Thinkzest

Tel: 01634671167

kier.humphreys@thinkzest.com

Contact Information

Kier Humphreys
Thinkzest

Tel: 01634671167

kier.humphreys@thinkzest.com

You wouldn't answer your phone here

So why do it while driving?

Fine, Points, Serious Crash.

Intro

There are times where it would be unthinkable for you to use your mobile phone - such as playing football, or getting married - so why do it while driving?

Despite legislation, recent figures have shown that over a third of individuals admitted to using their mobile phones whilst driving to text or access apps. This is troubling statistic considering that when using a mobile device, your ability to react quickly in an emergency is likely to be worse than that of a driver at the drink-drive limit.

Crashes caused by mobile phone use are completely avoidable - so make the right call, don't use your phone and drive.

Research

A new study by Kent County Council's Road Safety Team has found that a third of drivers in the county use their mobile phones while driving, including texting or accessing social networks, despite knowing it is dangerous and illegal.

2015 research has found that:

  • 59% of drivers admitted that mobile phones were a distraction to drivers
  • 33% of those aged under 35 admitted to using their phone whilst driving to text or access apps
  • 21% of all drivers admitted to using their phone whilst driving to text or access apps
  • 37% of those aged under 35 admitted to taking a hand-held call whilst driving
  • 27% of all drivers admitted to taking a hand-held call whilst driving

With research indicating that some individuals find it acceptable to use their mobile phone and drive, this campaign seeks to remind drivers that using phones, either hand-held or hands free whilst driving, places them and other road users in unnecessary and avoidable danger.

No matter what information you're getting from your phone, nothing is worth risking your own life and the lives of those around you. It really can wait.

Mobile Myths

It is legal to use your mobile phone when stopping at traffic lights or queuing in traffic.
Incorrect - it is illegal to use a mobile phone whilst operating a car if the keys are in the ignition.

Using your phone via Bluetooth or hands-free device is safe.
Incorrect - it is almost impossible to concentrate on two things at once safely and using a hands-free phone or Bluetooth can be just as distracting as a hand-held device.

It is legal to use a hand-held phone whilst supervising a learner driver
Incorrect - you are not legally allowed to use a hand-held phone whilst supervising a learner driver.

You cannot call 999 or 112 if the vehicle is moving or if you are stuck in traffic.
Incorrect - in an emergency, you are able to call the emergency services whilst behind the wheel.

Talking on a mobile phone whilst driving is no different to speaking to a passenger.
Incorrect - talking to someone over the phone is much harder than talking to someone sat next to you. Not only are people on the phone harder to hear, they also cannot see the road and will not be able to respond to any changes e.g. keeping quiet when you need to concentrate more.

A quick text or status update is fast enough to not cause a distraction.
Incorrect - even the quickest message or status update involves thinking about before and after the action, which means your thoughts are no longer on the road, where they should be.

We can all multi-task, so using a phone and driving shouldn't be a problem.
Incorrect - your brain cannot concentrate on two things at once equally, it will always pick what seems to be the most important activity and focus on that. Don't let your mobile phone cause you to lose focus on driving safely.